The Lone Dharma Yoga Teacher in the Desert

By Dani Gray

 

After my very first Dharma Yoga class in 2010, I knew something profound had happened.

Even before the class was over, I kept thinking, “This is not like anything I’ve done before. This isn’t just about ‘becoming more flexible.’ There is something else going on here, and I have to find out what it is.”

I was training to be a dancer at that time and had a knack for memorizing movement, so I went home and repeated the practice I had been taught, exactly as I learned it, nearly every day for the next two months. By the end of that time period, I was completely changed – many issues that I had been struggling with for years (physical, mental, emotional) had simply disappeared, and have not returned since that time. It took no extra effort on my part; all I had done was this simple asana practice, with an easy pranayama exercise and short meditation to close.

Upon realizing the transformation that had occurred, I had only one thought, “I have to learn how to share this with other people.” I applied for the 200-hour Life Of A Yogi (LOAY) teacher training program immediately.

Fast forward to today, five years later, when I’ve just recently finished the immersion portion of my 800-hour training, and have been teaching regularly where I live (the slightly strange tourist town of Sedona, Arizona) for a little over a year – on a more full-time basis for several months.

It didn’t take long for me to discover that teaching this much is the most perfect extension of everything I’ve learned – the practical application of all this sadhana, particularly the yamas and the niyamas, with a major emphasis on ahimsa, compassion.

I quickly noticed that what my students receive during my classes has a lot less to do with how much I know, and a lot more to do with the way I am. If I am strong in my own practice (and, as a result, centered & grounded within myself,) the teachings flow naturally & lovingly, and students are noticeably more receptive. Discovering how to meet students where they are and keep them engaged, without changing the core essence of the practice, has been a dynamic and fascinating learning process for me.

There are a lot of things I could say about what it’s like to be the only active Dharma Yoga teacher around for hundreds of miles – it has been immensely challenging at times, and I catch the mind occasionally making up stories about how what I do doesn’t really make a difference, or how students aren’t actually interested in really absorbing everything this practice can offer them. Usually at those times of doubt, Grace shows itself in some form – a student sharing a profound shift that’s occurred in his/her life, or a deep appreciation for the practice overall – and I am reminded why I began teaching in the first place.

As the beginnings of a small sangha have started to form in our town, I’ve witnessed the immense power of like-minded individuals coming together for a common purpose, and the transformations that occur without us having to even talk about it.

This practice speaks for itself, and one thing that has never wavered within me is my faith in what I have learned through this sadhana, and the truth of my own experience. To be one of the many teachers carrying the torch of this lineage has always been, from my perspective, an incredible privilege, and a call to truly live the teachings – to offer our lives in service as much as possible.

 

5-4-15Dani Gray currently lives and teaches in Sedona, Arizona.

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