Category Archives: self knowledge

Yoga For Trying Times

By Sri Dharma Mittra 

In terms of the world today and what the new (U.S.) president may be saying or doing, some people have a lot of fear or concern. What would you recommend for the people who are afraid or worried?

Many years ago, I asked my guru: what about the president now? He said to me with a smile: “Don’t you worry, my son. Everything is just perfect. If the majority of the people chose him, that’s just what the people deserve — are ready for.” So, everything is perfect. Not even one blade of grass moves without the will of the Almighty One. Do you think that the Almighty One is allowing something that is not right? Everything is perfect. We do our best to help, to influence him, but whatever is happening: perfect! People who get hurt in this process: they have their karma. Perfect. Everything is Divine. Don’t worry: there are Celestial Beings that went before us. They are watching the planet, allowing all these people to assume their positions. Everything is just perfect. Let’s do our best and pray for the president. Remember: he is our brother, too. In reality, he is doing Divine work. That’s what I think.

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Ahimsa and Veganism

by Susan Craig

“The most violent weapon on earth is the table fork.” Mahatma Gandhi

I became a vegan nearly 30 years ago – long before I found Sri Dharma. My decision to stop eating animals was born out of a very hopeless period in my life when I was severely abused. During that darkest days of my life I made a pact with myself that, as small and inconsequential as my life seemed to be, knowing what it felt like to be abused and to be treated as if I had no value, I would do my best not to treat others as if they had no value. This decision included non-human animals; the least that I could do was to stop eating them. Little did I know that this decision, along with the beginnings of an asana practice, would take me on a most amazing journey which recently included finding Sri Dharma Mittra as my yoga teacher.

While the deep pain in my life did not suddenly dissipate as a result of becoming a vegan, I did experience some immediate benefits. My overall physical health improved quickly and dramatically (To this day, at nearly 60 years old, I am far healthier than I was in my teens  and twenties.). Along with that, issues around body image and eating that had been a source of personal torture since my teens disappeared and never returned. These were miracles!

With veganism as a non-negotiable core value, along with the beginnings of an asana practice, I began the slow and arduous climb out of the deep pit that I found myself in. While I have utilized many additional means of recovery support along the way, I believe that the deepest and most profoundly transformative decision that I have made has been to become a vegan. Sri Dharma’s core teachings around Ahimsa certainly support this.

It is a rare individual who has not eaten animal flesh, dairy, and eggs. We have been born into cultures that treat food animals as commodities meant to be eaten. From birth we have been indoctrinated into a culture that tells us that we must consume animals, that it is normal and necessary for health. Upon questioning this indoctrination, however, we find that it is based upon false information. The human body is designed to thrive on a vegan diet. Additionally, on a deeper, spiritual level, the simple act of changing what we put on our plates at each meal – the decision not to participate in the abuse and slaughter of food animals, is liberating  beyond words. The benefits extend far beyond one’s health and spiritual development. As the effects of climate change become become increasingly evident, numerous sources of scientific research indicate that animal agriculture is the leading cause of global warming. (Perhaps the law of Karma is at work here…as we reap, so shall we sew.) What a blessing that, by choosing a plant-based diet, we are improving our own health, we are ceasing to participate in wide-spread violence towards sentient beings, and we are drastically reducing our contribution to the environmental stress on the planet!

In June 2015, I participated in the deeply transformative 200 hour LOAY training with Sri Dharma Mittra. Prior to making the decision to go through the LOAY training, as I searched for my yoga teacher, I started with one screening requirement: I needed a teacher who practiced and taught veganism as a core requirement of being a yogi. This one requirement narrowed the field of potential teachers down to few enough that I could count them on the fingers of one hand. Out of these few, I found myself drawn to Sri Dharma – his wisdom, dedication to his practice and to selfless service, his humility and egoless presence, and his fidelity to practicing and teaching the Yama of Ahimsa or non-violence. Ahimsa literally means A=not, himsa= killing or violence. In the LOAY Teachers’ Manual (2015, p. 4) Sri Dharma says, “Ahimsa means love; ‘thou shalt not kill!’ This applies not only to human beings, but to every living creature.”

Sri Dharma is one of the only yoga teachers of whom I am aware who does not shy away from teaching the yama of Ahimsa to his students truthfully. He regularly states while teaching that one must extend one’s compassion beyond one’s pets and that when one eats animals one is engaging in cruelty. He talks about how when one consumes animal products, one’s body becomes a morgue. In Sri Dharma’s words, “Without taking on the yama of ahimsa, there is little benefit to observing the other four yamas or any other aspect of the holy science of yoga.” (LOAY Teachers’ Manual, p. 5) I know, from the center of my soul, that this information is true and correct. The decision to become a vegan as a core component of one’s practice of Ahimsa will deepen and strengthen one’s  yoga practice. It will simultaneously improve the quality of one’s life immeasurably while benefiting other beings and the health of the planet. I highly recommend it!

Note: For additional information on the benefits of veganism that this blog has room for, I recommend reading The World Peace Diet by Dr. Will Tuttle and viewing the documentary, Cowspiracy.

Susan Craig is a Berkeley, California native who participated in the transformational June 2015 LOAY 200 hour training. Susan strives to practice Karma Yoga each day in her job as a school district administrator where she oversees support services for marginalized youth, as an advocate for animals through vegan activism, and as a teacher of a weekly donation-based yoga class. She resides in Napa in the home of the four cats and a rabbit who rescued her. Susan is most grateful to have found Dharma Yoga and to have Dharma Mittra as her yoga teacher and spiritual guide.

LOAY Teaching Manual: The Master’s Amazing Teachings and Techniques Are Now Available for Everyone

By Jerome Burdi

Sri Dharma Mittra is always passing on knowledge from deep within the wells of his being. It may be hard to grasp, or to remember for some, or maybe some of the words to a mantra are elusive.

Since the recent publication of the Dharma Yoga Life of a Yogi Teacher’s Manual, all of these techniques that will put you on the fast track to Self-Realization are available at your fingertips. The beautiful book was set to motion by Sri Dharma’s wife and longtime disciple, Eva Grubler, aka Ismrittee Devi Om, with the help of Life of a Yogi teacher training director Adam Frei.

“There are no books without a true purpose,” Eva said. “The Life of a Yogi Teachers’ Manual is the condensed work, and a constant reminder of the teachings of beloved Yogi Sri Dharma Mittra. It is a book of devotion and love for the purity of these teachings as expressed by Sri Dharma for the past half century. And best: you can have it with you at all times!”

For two-and-a-half years, Adam had a series of meetings and conversations with Sri Dharma during which they slowly went over all of the basic material.

“It was an enormous privilege to have had the opportunity to edit the manual into its current form,” Adam said. “It was, for me, the experience of a lifetime.”

The deep information given during teacher trainings has been compiled in the book, along with old photos of Sri Dharma, charts he drew by hand, and a bunch of yogi recipes that will prepare the body to go to the higher levels of the practice.

I especially love all the mantras from the lineage spelled out and translated, and the breathing techniques. These have helped me as a teacher and student. It’s good to study and practice these properly while you’re on your own. Then when you practice with the master you can go much deeper with confidence.

There’s a breakdown of the main yogic texts and just about all things yoga. One of the things I love about Sri Dharma is he makes all this knowledge available to anyone who cares to seek it out: teacher trainees, students, or anyone else.

I can hear the words of the master when I read the text:

“It’s important to repeat difficult things at least three times. You’ll find that with each repetition, the difficulty lessens. Repeating something seven times is better than three times, while ten times is truly ideal. Always keep the laws of physics in mind, as they are so often the key to unlocking the physical aspect of the postures. Also, just open your eyes whenever you are in class and observe what’s going on around you. You can learn so much this way.”

Sri Dharma emphasizes the importance of personal practice. There’s also a section in the book on what practices to do, especially if you are one of the many people with limited time. For a man who is widely known for his stunning asana, Sri Dharma is always talking about how the poses are not important. Just the basic ones will give you what you need as you continue on your path to the higher limbs of concentration, meditation, and Self-Realization.

Sri Dharma: “Regarding the aspiring yogis who may read these words, I wish you all to be engaged in constant practice — this is the secret to making progress. Meditate on compassion, stay vegan and seek enlightenment. Be obedient to your teacher and reverent to all. Oh my loved ones, keep yama and niyama. Then, you will have a shortcut to immortality.”

“Lastly, I love you all. I am you and you are me.”

 

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist

Without Compassion, There’s No Yoga in Your Asana

By Garth Hewitt

I remember practicing once with Sri Dharma when I first went to check out his classes about six years ago. It was a Master Class, but there were all levels of students in the room. Some of the students were very advanced –far more advanced than I. Some of the students were quite new and finding the class really challenging.

Sri Dharma loves to hold twisting extended side angle pose for a long time. We were holding this pose for a really long time at this class and there was a woman in the class who was having a really hard time maintaining her balance. She kept falling over and she was getting really upset and frustrated. She looked like she was on the verge of crying. You could feel that she was becoming very overwhelmed. My first reaction was to judge her. I’m embarrassed to share that with you. That was my first reaction, though. I remember thinking that she didn’t have any business coming to a Master Class when she was clearly a beginner. I was being such a selfish &$%-hole and I didn’t even realize it at the time.

Something amazing happened after that, that made me feel ashamed and made me re-think what I was doing on my yoga mat.

The regular Sri Dharma students around the woman started to encourage her and offer kind words. They let go of any focus on “their practice” and they focused on her and gave her their energy and attention. One of the students, in front of her, who had a very advanced asana practice, came out of his pose and walked over to her and helped her to find her balance. I heard him say, “It’s OK. This is a hard pose. You’re doing great.” Several students offered her their smiles and encouraging gestures. It was really beautiful to witness. I was blown away by the community and how everyone reached out to her. It almost made me cry.

I remember leaving the class and thinking about this moment for a long time. There was so much competition in the classes I was taking back in Los Angeles, so much ego. There was so much competition in my own practice, too, so much ego. This pursuit of asana, pursuing these fancy trick poses and advanced transitions. What was the point? I remember thinking after this class that these things aren’t yoga. Somehow, somewhere along the way, we’ve gotten off track; we’ve missed the point.

What happened in Sri Dharma’s Master class that day was yoga.

Sri Dharma always teaches that the number one practice is to be respectful and to be kind to all living beings. I’ve made many trips to New York now in the past six years and I’ve completed 800 hours of training with Sri Dharma. I’ve met so many incredible people through this community. Sure, there are some really advanced asana practitioners. Many of the people are way more advanced than me. Sri Dharma is a really advanced asana practitioner. The thing that I love so much about the Dharma community is that Sri Dharma teaches that the asana doesn’t really matter. It doesn’t mean anything if you aren’t moving through the world with kindness and love. The practice is so much more than just being able to do a fancy pose.

I was talking about Sri Dharma the other day, about the space that he creates in his classes. No competition in the room. This really wonderful community of students supporting each other, growing as a community, practicing as a community. One of my goals over the past six years has been to create this kind of space in my classes and encourage this same idea of community. A group of students coming together, connecting, supporting each other, growing, helping each other along the way.

Last week one of my students in one of our awesome communities (Westlake Village!!) was having a challenging time in a pretty tough class. This student sometimes leaves class when it gets too tough for her. I’ve encouraged her to stay and just come down and rest, to not give up on herself, but this is a habit that’s been hard for her to break. Sometimes when the going gets tough, she heads for the door.

When she got up to leave in the middle of this class, due to where I was standing in the room, she had to walk right past me on her way to the door. She tried not to look at me as she went by. I stopped instructing the class. I smiled at her and said, “Come on. You can stay. You can do this. You don’t have to leave. Come on.”

She stopped and the whole class looked at her. There was a long moment where we all waited to see what she was going to do. Then something amazing happened. Everyone started to encourage her to stay. They started to smile and tell her it was OK. That she would be fine.

People said things like, “You can do it!” and “Stay, we’ll do it with you!” There was so much love in the room. It overwhelmed her and she smiled and went back to her mat to stick it out and finish the class.

This was one of the most special moments for me ever as a teacher. I watched this really strong group of students, mostly regulars, who’ve been coming to class for a while now together practicing yoga. I watched these guys, not just doing asana, but practicing yoga and I was so proud of them as a teacher.

After the class, I talked to my student who had given up on herself and asked her if she felt good that she had stayed for the whole class and she said she had never felt so much love from a group of people in a class before. Powerful stuff.

Be kind and respectful to others. Love. Open your heart. Help someone who needs help. These are the greatest things that we can teach to our students. Thank you, Sri Dharma, for teaching me about what really matters. These are the great moments we get to experience as teachers and why I love my job so much! Thank you for letting me hold the space and passing on the teaching of my teachers.

 

IMG_5642Garth Hewitt is a 500hr E-RYT, Teacher Trainer, Yoga Therapist, Certified Yogaworks Teacher, Certified Dharma Yoga Teacher, and has led classes, workshops, retreats and teacher trainings in Los Angeles and around the world. Garth taught for several years at the original Yogaworks in Santa Monica and at Exhale – The Center for Sacred Movement in Venice.  He led the first Pure Yoga Teacher Training, in Los Angeles, at Equinox, with Ashley Turner.  He has been featured in and contributes regularly to: Yoga Journal, Men’s Health Magazine, Mantra Magazine, Yoganonymous and LA Yoga.  He has spent time in Mysore, India, studying Ashtanga Yoga, with the Sri K. Patthabi Jois family, practicing with Saraswati Jois. Garth teaches integrated yoga classes, focusing on; alignment, breath and concentration. He also teaches: pranayama, meditation, yoga nidra and sees students privately for yoga therapy sessions.

 

The Lone Dharma Yoga Teacher in the Desert

By Dani Gray

 

After my very first Dharma Yoga class in 2010, I knew something profound had happened.

Even before the class was over, I kept thinking, “This is not like anything I’ve done before. This isn’t just about ‘becoming more flexible.’ There is something else going on here, and I have to find out what it is.”

I was training to be a dancer at that time and had a knack for memorizing movement, so I went home and repeated the practice I had been taught, exactly as I learned it, nearly every day for the next two months. By the end of that time period, I was completely changed – many issues that I had been struggling with for years (physical, mental, emotional) had simply disappeared, and have not returned since that time. It took no extra effort on my part; all I had done was this simple asana practice, with an easy pranayama exercise and short meditation to close.

Upon realizing the transformation that had occurred, I had only one thought, “I have to learn how to share this with other people.” I applied for the 200-hour Life Of A Yogi (LOAY) teacher training program immediately.

Fast forward to today, five years later, when I’ve just recently finished the immersion portion of my 800-hour training, and have been teaching regularly where I live (the slightly strange tourist town of Sedona, Arizona) for a little over a year – on a more full-time basis for several months.

It didn’t take long for me to discover that teaching this much is the most perfect extension of everything I’ve learned – the practical application of all this sadhana, particularly the yamas and the niyamas, with a major emphasis on ahimsa, compassion.

I quickly noticed that what my students receive during my classes has a lot less to do with how much I know, and a lot more to do with the way I am. If I am strong in my own practice (and, as a result, centered & grounded within myself,) the teachings flow naturally & lovingly, and students are noticeably more receptive. Discovering how to meet students where they are and keep them engaged, without changing the core essence of the practice, has been a dynamic and fascinating learning process for me.

There are a lot of things I could say about what it’s like to be the only active Dharma Yoga teacher around for hundreds of miles – it has been immensely challenging at times, and I catch the mind occasionally making up stories about how what I do doesn’t really make a difference, or how students aren’t actually interested in really absorbing everything this practice can offer them. Usually at those times of doubt, Grace shows itself in some form – a student sharing a profound shift that’s occurred in his/her life, or a deep appreciation for the practice overall – and I am reminded why I began teaching in the first place.

As the beginnings of a small sangha have started to form in our town, I’ve witnessed the immense power of like-minded individuals coming together for a common purpose, and the transformations that occur without us having to even talk about it.

This practice speaks for itself, and one thing that has never wavered within me is my faith in what I have learned through this sadhana, and the truth of my own experience. To be one of the many teachers carrying the torch of this lineage has always been, from my perspective, an incredible privilege, and a call to truly live the teachings – to offer our lives in service as much as possible.

 

5-4-15Dani Gray currently lives and teaches in Sedona, Arizona.

https://www.facebook.com/dani.gray.948

A Walden State of Mind

by Barrie Rosencrans

You know what they say: sometimes what you’re looking for can be found right in your own back yard.

I live in a place called Walden, about an hour’s drive from Cleveland, a serene and idyllic community built to emanate the tranquility and earth-bound Shangri-La made most famous by Henry David Thoreau.  You don’t bump into Walden; it’s a destination.  Little did I know this fact of life—my life—would come full circle at the top of 2015.

When change is in the air, things are stirred, and sometimes we’re unsettled. Think of the autumn leaves preparing for winter, or a storm that’s beginning to rain. I was fully unaware when I met Sri Dharma for his NYC New Year’s Eve Immersion that he would visit Walden, where I not only live but am also a proprietor of the wellness center. I decided to truly practice one of the yamas (non-hoarding aparigraha,) and share Walden and its beauty with Sri Dharma Mittra.  It’s important to me that Walden, in addition to its serene horse-farm surroundings and organic local menu, also feed the soul.

Sri Dharma Mittra arrived at Walden on April 17, 2015 with a message of compassion, trust, kindness, goodness, friendships, self-investigation, love for all beings everywhere (“even the piggies.”)  His teachings embodied principles of the Yamas, individual precepts of the Niyamas, asana postures, pranayama, pratyahara, dharana, dhyana, chanting, kriyas, mantra, Yoga Nidra and meditation. (Touching all of Patanjali’s 8 limbs of yoga in one weekend!) The medical/ clinical benefits of yoga were also a message that he delivered during his visit.

This was a definite highlight of my pursuit in bringing a yoga studio to Northeast Ohio (NEO,) an area currently in the midst of a cultural boom, but still in need of my native NYC touch. Two years ago, Dharma Yoga teachers first came to Walden, sharing their hearts and opening NEO’s minds to Dharma Yoga’s philosophies.

In Sri Dharma Mittra’s never-ending supportive manner, his teachings encouraged me to take risks, be enthusiastic, and to realize that truly all I have is me. All my fears washed away as I dove into the growth of Walden Wellness.

When Sri Dharma came to teach, he spoke of protecting and saving our earth as well as realizing the world beyond our own conception and even to other galaxies. This brought to mind a statement by esteemed Astronomer Carl Sagan, “For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love.”

Sri Dharma’s lectures during the Satsang and Maha Sadhana segments of his Walden immersion truly opened minds up to the possibility of space, time and personal existence.

My karma may be to share yoga- cost effectively- to those people who could not travel to NYC, but who could truly benefit from practicing and studying Dharma Yoga here. Without ever expecting anything in return, I worked on my dream and thought, “If not now… when?”

During a class with Sri Dharma Mittra I heard him make reference to the “Eternal Now”, a concept which stayed with me, in my heart for days- thinking, pondering, and examining what I can do to make the present moments count. We could all think, “What do I currently have that I can share?” It may make your “eternal now” seem significant, promote contemplation.

A true Walden state of mind is difficult to sum up here in words, simply because it’s an embodiment of your lifestyle every single day.  It’s honoring your full surroundings: the people, the nature, the animals.  (As a result of Sri Dharma MIttra’s talk on loving the animals, we scheduled successful vegetarian and vegan cooking classes last Spring.)  Moreover, when we create positive changes we affect all around us, every living thing benefits from our actions.  My dream is to turn my little piece of Ohio into a dreamscape for those who yearn to go inside themselves to be their best and share that magnanimous love.

“The best that could happen IS happening” – Sri Dharma Mittra

Jan. 2015- New Year’s Immersion

 

IMG_1857Barrie, a New York City native and professionally trained dancer,  discovered yoga in 2001 while pregnant with her third child. Since then Barrie has wholeheartedly embraced the Dharma Yoga 8 limbed path of Raja Yoga and is a devoted teacher of daily donation based classes, spreading yogic love via Walden Wellness. With much heartfelt gratitude Barrie attributes her road to Sri Dharma Mittra in 2015 after learning under Sri Andre Ram at Walden in January 2014. Barrie–wife, mother of three teenage boys, and two golden retrievers–holds a masters degree from Case Western Reserve University’s Medical School in metabolism & nutrition, is currently the proprietor of Spa Walden (www.yourwalden.com).

On the Cusp of Transcendence

by Dani Gray

During the summer leading up to my 500-hour training, I spent a lot of time at the Dharma Yoga Center. I was living on the Upper West Side, and finding that the only way I really wanted to spend my time was taking class – being around Sri Dharma Mittra as much as possible.

In that time of my life, the devotion that blossomed within me was unprecedented; although I had done my 200-hour training about one year prior, I had never felt this level of unconditional love for a teacher before. Dharmaji awakened many other aspects of my human self that were previously hidden or diminished in their expression, and as my 500-hour training approached, I knew I was ready for the level of growth and transformation that awaited me – I craved the intensity of sadhana that was being offered through this program, and I couldn’t wait to start.

Now that I am teaching almost full-time, people ask me often about my experiences in teacher training, and I almost always tell them that the trainings I have done were, without a doubt, the best investments I ever made in myself – the seeds that were planted during the immersions continue to bear fruit even today, almost three years after the completion of my 500-hour.

Especially as I’ve begun to prepare for my 800-hour training, people ask even more questions:

“Are you excited? You must be so excited.”
“Wow, 800 hours? How does that fit into a week?”
“So what are you going to be learning, exactly?”
“Oh my gosh, you’re going to be a completely different person when you get back.”

All these questions and comments come to me with such pure love and joyful curiosity, from enthusiastic students and fellow teachers in my community; these reflections from others have brought me to very deep levels of self-inquiry – both getting clear within myself about my intentions for this training, and also realizing that there is, in reality, no way to prepare for the immensity of what lies ahead.

I remember the summer before my 500-hour training very clearly: it was the first time the 800-hour was being offered, and each day when I would take class with the trainees or catch snippets and sound-bytes from their sessions underneath the door to the studio, I would always think to myself, “I don’t know that I’ll EVER be ready for that training.”

Now I’m here, about to begin, and it’s still true – in so many ways, I am not ever going to be ready. To have the honor and privilege to learn such high-level, subtle practices, and be given the tools to teach these processes to others – it’s almost unbelievable, and to even think of the possibility humbles me.

To embark on the journey of the 800-hour training is, from my perspective, the ultimate extension and expression of the practice of Dharma Yoga. The essential pillars of this practice, of everything that Dharmaji shares with us, have come back to me over and over as the training has come closer, and their obvious necessity has become clear:

-Remain as a witness.
-Renounce the fruits of your actions (and any expectations).
-Abide in this eternal present.
-Be receptive, to the infinite Grace of G-d.

5-4-15Dani Gray currently lives and teaches in Sedona, Arizona. https://www.facebook.com/dani.gray.948

Reflections on Guru Purnima

By Sandra Lafuente

I am writing this on Guru Purnima. There are no words in this physical gross plane that can really depict the gratitude and love I feel for Sri Dharma Mittra, but I will try to use the ones I know that come from the heart.

I love him beyond everything that is tangible. Same way I love my grandfather Bernardino, the first guru I ever had, not in his body anymore. Same respect and tenderness. They are so alike. They teach me the same.

Dharma Mittra-ji embodies the deepest meaning of Yoga in the simplest way. The innermost sacred message: life is a game. It’s all an ilusion. If one is established in the Higher Self, in what is Real, suffering disappears while playing the game. One is content. One is sattva. One Is.

Guru-ji takes out of me the child I never stopped being although I concealed it for so long. He helps me bring that little girl back. Fearless, joyful, curious, lively. The child whose divine qualities are stainless. He helps take the dust off and see her as she is, natural wild perfect. A manifestation of God.

That is what practicing with him is about. Do it now, don’t even think about the results. Do not fear. Laugh. It is easy. It is simple. Play!

Five years passed before I came back to New York to be at the presence of Sri Dharma again. Intense purging, purifying, long five years I went through with the main guidance of Andrei Ram. The bitter before the nectar. That period was preparation to come back. I realized I never lost the psychic connection with Dharma-ji, the link became more powerful in the most arduous times. I tuned in and he taught: don’t take it so seriously, don’t be so hard on you, don’t try to be perfect in the changing world of forms and names, you are already perfect in your formless nameless no beginning never ending Self. Act with no expectations. Love. Live!

Then I went back to his temple in June for a whole month. I recognized his voice as if I never stopped hearing it –I never did. It was as if I just took his class the day before and every previous day, non-stop. As if he never left me and I never left home.

And so I heard him saying that the meaning of life is to experience all manifestations of the Creation, that one should enjoy everything but be ready to lose it all.

That’s it!  Go ahead, make mistakes, learn from them, be patient. It is in this very world where you have to be. It is in this very maya where you have to reach for the Light and make it permanent.

And then I played, although the body hurt like hell at the beginning because of old physical and emotional injuries. The mind wanted to win me over, but I didn’t give out. Tried over and over. I did it because it had to be done. Like a child. Like that little girl. No worries, unconcerned, happy.

It is much much easier than the mind puts it. It is uncomplicated. Effortless if one stops resisting. So difficult to get to surrender to God, so liberating once you have accomplished it. I am still working on getting there but have savored it periodically. Ananda. Wholeness. Letting yourself be carried by the Mother-Father, by the Supreme Master within. Freedom!

That is what Dharma Mittra-ji teaches.

I brought a friend who lives in New York to Maha Shakti, the day before I came back to Madrid. He had never practiced with Dharma-ji. I saw his perennial smile while doing every posture, all of them. I asked him how he felt at the end of the session. “It was like going back to school,” he replied.

Thank you, beloved Guru. Thank you to the brothers and sisters who brought me closer to you like angels.  I bow and I am humble. We are One.

OM

 

Sandra Lafuente was born and brought up in Venezuela in this lifetime. She currently lives and teaches in Madrid, where she also works as a freelance reporter and writer. She has realized, no doubt, there is Yoga in journalism, Yama and Niyama being the foundation, although she does not write about spiritual matters. Always grateful to the Supreme Source, to the Guru, the masters and the Sangha, she keeps working ceaselessly for the ultimate purpose of Yoga, God-realization.

(Picture by Fabio Filippi)

Sri Dharma’s Humble Power Helped This Popular Teacher Find His Way

By Jerome Burdi

Mark Kan’s reputation preceded him during my 500-hour teacher training at Dharma Yoga Center. Some of his students from London came to learn with Sri Dharma Mittra and they told me about how challenging Mark’s class was. It’s a good thing I like challenges.

Mark was one of the mentors during the training and offered a master class during it. The class was intense, a hail of inversions and a flow of physical postures that didn’t seem to stop. The class ended only because we ran out of time. Mark could have kept going. But myself and most others were ready for the sweet dreamless sleep of savasana, which was beautiful.

Though Mark’s classes are physically challenging, if you’re receptive, you can also pick up on the spirituality coming through the class. That’s because Mark, despite being as comfortable on his hands as he is his feet, is more than just the asanas. He’s a sadhaka who is extremely reverent and grateful to Sri Dhamra Mittra.

I caught up with Mark recently while he was in New York mentoring a 200-hour training at the center.

Q: How did your yoga journey begin?

A: My yoga journey began when my life was “in the meantime.” I was a little lost and I was disillusioned with my [graphic design] career and compensating that with a very disruptive social life.

My upbringing began in the Catholic tradition so I always had this spiritual seed that was planted but never really germinated because of things that happened when I was a young adult. My parents got ill and passed away when I was in my 20s and that was a difficult time. I lost my path and lost my faith. I ambled half way through my 30s just thinking I wanted to get by. That’s when I started to think I needed something else. Some colleagues I was working with were practicing yoga so I decided to give it a try.

Q: What did you find once you started yoga?

A: I felt like I needed more of a spiritual path. Unfortunately the teachers I was turning to weren’t that spiritual. It was asana focused but there was no one to guide me anywhere. I realized they had the same weaknesses as me. And I thought, ‘Where do we go from here?’

But I carried on with the practice. I practiced Sivananda Yoga, Ashtanga, Jivamukti, Bikram Yoga, I tried everything and I enjoyed the challenges that they brought. And then, very suddenly, my eldest brother died in his sleep. It was such a difficult time for me. I was really heartbroken. I was just lost for a whole year. I didn’t know who to turn to. There was no one to turn to except my siblings. We were all struggling to work out how this could have happened, why it happened. Who could do this to us?

One afternoon after practicing Bikram Yoga, I was browsing around their book shop and I came across the 608 asana book [by Sri Dharma Mittra]. I was just flicking through it and I thought, ‘Wow, this is a proper yogi.’ Just looking at the poses and seeing the message that was coming from the poses. You look at people doing asana now, and it’s very impressive, very gymnastic and graceful but with Dharma’s poses you just felt that power coming through them. And you just think, ‘Somebody’s worked very hard to get to that stage and he’s gone through every conceivable process to get there.’

But I thought he wasn’t alive anymore because the pictures looked old!

Shortly after, I was practicing Ashtanga Yoga and my teacher mentioned that Dharma Mittra was coming to London. I was really blown away by that. He was coming in February 2006. I booked the whole weekend on the basis of this book.

Q: What was it like to meet Sri Dharma?

A: I went and saw a short man, like myself, just wandering around, no ego there, just looking really quiet and content.

That day was a big turning point for me. Before he did any asanas, he sat everybody down and started talking about God dwelling in the right side of your heart. I’d been in such a dark place for so long because of my brother’s death. So it was just like somebody picking you up and holding you and saying everything was going to be alright. He switched a light on in a really dark heart. I felt everything was going to start be be OK as I sat and listened to him intensely. Up until that point I still ate meat and when he spoke about going vegetarian, it made so much sense. That evening I went home and there was chicken in the fridge and there was shrimp in the freezer. I just took it out and threw it in the bin and it’s never been back since.

Q: How was the practice?

A: The actual practice that day blew me away. I thought I was quite good at the time. I was in a room full of London’s most advanced yogis and it shocked me. As far as the asana goes, I thought, ‘That’s really challenged my ego.’ I realized if I want to develop my asanas, how far I needed to go.

Becoming a yoga teacher

After his fateful meeting with Sri Dharma, Mark went to northern India and spent time in the Sivananda ashram where he became certified as a yoga teacher. Upon returning to London, he still thought about Sri Dharma and felt a calling to practice with him again, which he did, in February 2008 for the 500-hour training. Mark said it was amazing practicing and learning with the sangha at the former Dharma Yoga East.

When Mark went back to London and started teaching Dharma Yoga, it was an instant hit. And it has continued to grow. There are now about 15 Dharma Yoga certified teachers teaching in the London area.

Mark usually practices two hours a day, channeling Sri Dharma through his asana, and it shows in his stunning practice and teachings.

“I’m still honored to be in his presence,” Mark said at the Dharma Yoga Center as the sun was shining through the windows. “Look at this city, look at what goes on and we’re all here. I could be out there doing anything but I just want to be here. That’s the measure of him.”

With a laugh, he added, “Another thing to end on is he never knows my name. He thinks I’m Mike from Hong Kong.”

 

 

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist.

The Fountain of Wisdom Has Many Spouts

By Jerome Burdi

 

Honor the man who is awake and shows you the way.
Honor the fire of his sacrifice.
-Lord Buddha

 

The summer satsangs have been powerful in New York City with Amma and the Dalai Lama coming to visit. All sorts of spiritual seekers and socialites filled their rooms for divine hugs or holy words of wisdom.

There’s much deserved fanfare over their visits and deep appreciation for their loving contributions to humanity. I love it when the holy step foot into New York City, a place that can always use some holiness. But when all the saints and buddhas come to visit, I never feel an urge to go see them. We have Sri Dharma Mittra, the man who I’ve come to love as much as any of the famous gurus. And he’s here all the time! I’m at home in his yoga classes and satsangs and feel full. I do not have any room for another great teacher.

I respect them all, and they all pretty much say the same thing. It comes from the deep fountain of human wisdom. The way Sri Dharma said it recently: “Yoga is this: See yourself in others.”

The way some others put it not so recently:

 

“See yourself in others.
Then whom can you hurt?
What harm can you do?”
-Lord Buddha

 

“Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”
-Jesus the Christ

 

It is wonderful to find teachers who help us express this power and spread it in the world. Then we too become teachers. It is nearly impossible to walk the way alone, without a teacher who can show you the way. They help us by making it easier to trudge through difficult times of doubt and they inspire us to move forward and know that it will all be alright.

I’m always thinking about things Sri Dharma says when I’m alone and the darkness creeps in. His wisdom is like a rope thrown to me at the bottom of the well. The rope is there but I have to use my own strength to pull myself out of the deep and into the light.

Doubt is so strong, so seductive, it’s easy to lose the way. That’s why it’s so important to have great teachers such as Sri Dharma close by and accessible often. Eventually we will have to walk the road ourselves; Sri Dharma is always warning us to enjoy everything but not to be attached, perhaps the most difficult lesson of all.

Thanks to the masters who have come before us, we too can fill ourselves with bliss and learn to circle through samsara, with a smile.

 

 

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist

Jerome Burdi is a Brooklyn native who discovered yoga during a shamanic retreat in Brazil in 2010. Since then, he’s been enveloped by the path of the yogi. He left his job as a newspaper journalist to go to Rishikesh, India, and become a yoga teacher. Upon returning to NYC, he discovered Dharma Yoga and has been hooked. Though Jerome grew up in NY, he had to go to India to come back and see Sri Dharma with clear eyes and to hear the truth that is Dharma Yoga. Jerome is also a Middle Eastern style percussionist and holistic nutritionist.